Fabletters on Beauty

Dear Ceanray,

We live in a society where our own personal definitions of beauty are constantly challenged. Sadly, they are also constantly changed. Commercials tell us that we need certain products to be beautiful, and we see recurring images in media that show us “ideals” of beauty. This is damaging for so many reasons.

We are all born with our individual thoughts, opinions, and reasons that we are beautiful. As we grow older and are exposed to more forms of media, our definitions of beauty slowly start to change. If we don’t see ourselves represented, be it on advertisements or on our favourite TV show, then we are sent the message that we are not important. And, because we see other people represented, we start to value their traits more than our own.

Norman Cousins once said, “the true tragedy of life is not death, but what we let die inside of us while we live.” I really like the way this quote is worded, because it says “what we let die.” It can be really difficult to not let the media influence our definitions of beauty, but if we can accomplish it it is ultimately worth it.

What did the word ‘beautiful’ mean to you – before anyone tried to change your definition?

Sherina

Dear Sherina,

I thought I would begin my response to your letter with one of my favourite Audrey Hepburn quotes; “the beauty of a woman is not in a facial mode but the true beauty in a woman is reflected in her soul. It is the caring that she lovingly gives the passion that she shows. The beauty of a woman grows with the passing years.”

Before anyone tried to change my definition of beauty, I had an abstract concept of what the word meant. It meant very little to me until society began to shape my definition of the word “beauty” not as a word in itself, but as a set of ideals as to how we must look in order to be pleasing to the eye.

It is my firm belief that beauty is how you feel about yourself on the inside, which is subsequently reflected on the outside – not vice versa. We must teach ourselves that our uniqueness and what we have to offer is what makes us beautiful, not our ability or inability to fit into the mold that society has created.

Ceanray

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2 thoughts on “Fabletters on Beauty

  1. Why are women expected to be beautiful at all? Men aren’t. Why is female value so dependent on beauty, however it is defined? My theory is that beauty is an oppressive concept when applied to human beings. All women have value, regardless of their appearance, regardless of how they feel on the inside.

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