Why We Need to Shatter the Glass Ceiling

Dear Ceanray,

There’s an old proverb that says ‘those in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones’. I would like to amend this expression to say ‘those who look up at glass ceilings should throw all the stones they can find’. The glass ceiling, in case you don’t know, is “an unofficially acknowledged barrier to advancement in a profession, especially affecting women and members of minorities.” (thanks, Google!)

A few months ago, the New York Times wrote about a startling statistic: there are more men named John who run companies than women who run companies altogether. This statement tells us that less parents should name their kids John. More importantly, though, it tells us that the lack of women in leadership positions in the corporate world is a serious issue.

guysnamedjohn

In my opinion there are several factors which contribute to these numbers: the most obvious of which is that some people still believe men are superior to women, and therefore prefer to hire and promote men into high-ranking positions. There’s also the stigma around women in leadership (with powerful women being called “bossy” among other things).

Empowering women would make a difference; movements like #likeagirl are helping to do this, and in my mind there’s been a lot of great focus on female empowerment in recent years. Still though, even when women want to be in a high-ranking position, there seem to be barriers that stand in their way.

Feminism, as we’ve discussed previously, means political, social, and economic equality for both sexes. So, by advocating for women in leadership I’m not dissing all of the men who lead companies. John’s and David’s, keep doing you. But prepare for women to join you at the top of the proverbial career ladder – and prepare for women to shatter the glass ceiling.

Sherina

Dear Sherina,

It’s alarming that in 2015 women are still so grossly underrepresented in the corporate world. Some might say that the reason this arena continues to be dominated by men is simply because there are more men qualified to fill high-ranking positions. While as many as 60% of university students in North America are female, “women account only for 2.7 percent of the chief executives in the financial industry”. Being a woman in the corporate world is a lonely pursuit these days.

On a personal note, I am seriously considering pursuing a university degree in political science once I graduate from high school. I am fascinated by government and how (in an idyllic sense, it would seem these days) ordinary people are given the power to change their circumstance in a democratic society.

However, I am not entirely sure that being a politician appeals to me. The level of media scrutiny female politicians are regularly faced with in comparison to their male counterparts is, quite frankly, appalling. During Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign, far more attention was given to her physical appearance rather than her political capabilities. A segment on MSNBC had this written on the screen crawl while her campaign was discussed;

“CLEAVAGE CONTROVERSY: HILLARY CLINTON’S CAMP ASKING FOR MONEY AMID LOW-CUT BLOUSE BROUHAHA”

A so-called ‘newscaster’ on Fox News commented “You all saw that photo on the weekend of Hillary looking so haggard and like, what, 92 years old!”

Ms. Clinton is but one example of the oft-prevailing misogynistic attitudes towards women in politics and in influential leadership positions. As someone who will be directly affected in her life by this glass ceiling, I would like to call upon fellow human beings to collectively resolve, as you said, to make the glass ceiling a thing of the past and a nonexistent hindrance to the futures of girls and women all over the planet.

Ceanray

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